Alphonso Maldon, Sports

Washington Nationals Select Contract of Pitcher Matt Albers

 

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Alphonso Maldon, Sports

Washington Nationals’ Superstar Outfielder Bryce Harper

Bryce Harper pic
Bryce Harper
Image: mlb.com

Alphonso Maldon earned a master’s degree in human relations from the University of Oklahoma, graduating as a member of Alpha Kappa Mu Honor Society. Currently serving as president and CEO of Washington, DC-based Partnership Strategies Consulting, Alphonso Maldon is also co-owner of the Nationals, a Major League Baseball (MLB) franchise he and a group of corporate and private investors helped bring to Washington in 2005.

Although the Nationals have only made the MLB playoffs twice since arriving in Washington, the team has developed impressive young stars, most notably outfielder Bryce Harper, who was the first overall pick by the franchise in the 2010 MLB Amateur Draft. Drafted out of the College of Southern Nevada, Harper played a little more than one season in the minor leagues before reaching the majors as a 19-year-old in 2012. He hit 22 home runs in his debut season and was named the National League Rookie of the Year, receiving 16 of 32 possible first-place votes.

Harper hit 24 home runs the following season and 13 in 2014, when he was limited to 100 games due to injury. In 2015, however, he won the National League MVP after hitting a league-best 42 home runs and scoring a league-high 118 runs. He also led the league in on-base percentage and slugging.

Alphonso Maldon, Sports

The Recent Success of the Washington Nationals

 

Washington Nationals pic
Washington Nationals
Image: washington.nationals.mlb.com

Alphonso Maldon is the founder of Partnership Strategies Consulting, a firm he continues to lead as president and CEO. In these roles, he engages with companies and organizations preparing to expand into the federal market space. Beyond his professional activities, Alphonso Maldon enjoys supporting Washington Nationals baseball.

First joining Major League Baseball (MLB) in 1969 as the Montreal Expos, the Washington baseball team moved to the US capital and took the Nationals name in 2005. Over the course of the 12 seasons the team has played since relocating, the Nationals have experienced a number of highs and lows, from back-to-back 59-win seasons in 2008 and 2009 to first-place National League (NL) finishes in 2012 and 2014.

The National’s 98 wins in 2012 broke a franchise record set in 1979 by the Expos. The Nationals outscored opponents by 137 runs that season, thanks in part to the efforts of pitcher Gio Gonzalez, who finished the year with a 21-8 record. Washington qualified for the postseason for the first time in Nationals history and the first time in franchise history since 1982, but ultimately fell in five games to the St. Louis Cardinals in an NL division series (NLDS) matchup.

Two years later, in 2014, the Washington Nationals ruled the NL standings once again, recording 96 regular-season victories. In the playoffs that year, the Nationals lost to the eventual World Series champion San Francisco Giants. The 2016 Nationals ended the season with 95 wins, second in the NL and tied for the third highest in franchise history.

Alphonso Maldon, Sports

Washington, DC and Major League Baseball, Reunited after 34 Years

 

Washington Nationals pic
Washington Nationals
Image: washington.nationals.mlb.com

Mr. Alphonso Maldon is the president and founder of Partnership Strategies Consulting, a private consulting firm that specializes in teaching small and mid-sized businesses the strategic steps necessary to acquire federal contracts. Mr. Alphonso Maldon also managed the investment group that financed the bid for the purchase of the Major League’s Washington Nationals Baseball Club. As a founding partner, Mr. Maldon used his knowledge of finance to bring together the Lerner Group, investors that bought the Washington Nationals baseball franchise.

When the Washington Senators moved to Texas in 1971, the 71-year history of a Washington, D.C.-affiliated baseball team was broken. The Senators had played through 11 presidents throwing out the first pitch of the season, as well as three vice presidents. Their last season playing in Washington was a losing season that ended with a record of 63-92. This season was the inspiration for the phrase, “Washington, first in war, first in peace, and last in the American League.”

Even with the losing record, baseball fans in Washington were not happy to see their team leave; the last game in Washington was played amid the boos and jeers of the fans that resulted in a riot and the forfeiture of the game.

After the Senators left, there were other attempts to purchase a franchise, but it was 34 years later before Washington rejoined the Major Leagues. The Lerner Group successfully bid for the franchise, reuniting Washington, D.C. fans and Major League Baseball.